Bara, Bara, Bara

May 27 | 2017


Dallas Contemporary | 2PM

Pia Camil brings her normally static work to life. Through this act of alchemy, she explores themes of collective participation, urban growth and commodity culture. 

Directly following the performance, the artist talks about her performance piece and how it interacts with her solo exhibition, which continues through August 2017. 

FREE Event!
 

Artist Talk: Pia Camil
SAT | MAY 27 | 5PM

The artist talks about her performance piece and how it interacts with her solo exhibition, which continues through August 2017. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

In this work Pia Camil mines behaviors indicative of consumer culture—addressing Mexico/US relations and Texas, specifically, as the site of her exhibition. Past projects such as Wearing, Watching and A Pot for a Latch invited unexpected involvement from the audience as a vital element of the work. For Dallas, Camil is creating pieces that similarly call for communal interaction.

Camil’s latest body of work involves the reworking of t-shirts purchased at secondhand clothing markets in Mexico City. The shirts sold were originally produced in Latin America and sold in the United States. After wear, the shirts found their way to Mexico City to be sold in bulk. Camil acquires and transforms these shirts into massive textiles by taking them apart and then sewing them back together. The result is massive sheets of multicolored fabrics, punctuated by the neck openings of various shirts. At her Dallas Contemporary exhibition, the sheets are presented as awnings, reminiscent of those at the Las Torres Market in Iztapalapa, Mexico City, where the shirts were purchased.

For SOLUNA, the exhibition is partially dismantled. The work becomes a catalyst for communal interaction. The performance is inspired by Brazilian artist Lygia Pape’s 1968 Divisor in which participants activated a massive sheet of white fabric in the streets of Rio de Janerio, Brazil. Slits were cut throughout the sheet allowing individuals to stick their head through them. As a result, all participants had to navigate the city together. Pia Camil’s Divisor Pirata functions in a similar manner as the community is invited to inhabit her piece and move in unison—exploring themes of the collective and utopian ideals. 

 

 

 

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