Conga Drum

FAMILY

Percussion


DESCRIPTION

The conga drum is a tall, narrow, single-headed drum from Cuba. Congas are staved like barrels. Congas are traditionally used in Afro-Cuban genres such as conga and rumba, although they are now very common in some other forms of Latin music.

Most modern congas have a wooden or fiberglass shell, and a screw-tensioned drumhead. They are usually played in sets of two to four with the fingers and palms of the hand. Typical congas stand approximately 75 centimetres (30 in) from the bottom of the shell to the head. The drums may be played while seated. Alternatively, the drums may be mounted on a rack or stand to permit the player to play while standing.

Conga players are called congueros. The term "conga" was popularized in the 1930s, when Latin music swept the United States, and was derived from the traditional rhythm congueros would play during carnival time in Cuba.